Paris - Ile De France Section

Passage des Deux Pavillons, a short cut to Palais-Royal

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Passage des Deux Pavillons, a shortcut between Palais-Royal and Rue Vivienne

The Passage des Deux Pavillons is on the northern side of the Palais-Royal gardens.

It's also one of the few remaining covered passages of Paris.

Count Dervilliers opened this passage in 1820 to connect n6-8, rue de Beaujolais to no5 rue des Petits Champs.

This 33m long covered passage is a shortcut that takes its name from the two 17th century pavilions that frame it.

It originally exited opposite the Galerie Colbert, thus funneling the pedestrians coming from the Palais-Royal towards the covered passage.

Mr Marchoux, the owner of the next door Galerie Vivienne, bought the Passage des Deux Pavillons and redesigned its layout to make it exit opposite his shopping arcade.

This modification gave the Passage des Deux Pavillons its unusual cross-shape.

It also deviated all the flow of customers from the Galerie Colbert straight into the Galerie Vivienne, bringing the first to the verge of bankrupt.

Fortunately the Galerie Colbert survived, and while less busy that its neighbour, it today attracts prestigious world institutions.

The Passage des Deux Pavillons might be very short, but it has a lot of charm; it has indeed retained its original plaster decor representing Winged Victories and Fames.

A charming shortcut listed Historical Monument and definitively worth the detour!

Free access
Always open

Directions: 1st district - nos6-8, rue de Beaujolais - no5 rue des Petits Champs
Metro stations: Palais-Royal-Musée du Louvre on Lines 1, 7 or Bourse on Line 3
Coordinates Lat 48.866126 – Long 2.339045

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