ArabicChinese (Simplified)DutchEnglishFrenchGermanGreekHindiItalianJapanesePortugueseRussianSpanish

Paris - Ile De France

Parc Monceau - Pavillon de Chartres - Paris

This page was updated on: Saturday, February 3, 2018 at: 3:00 pm

The medieval village of Monchauf

Parc Monceau is a public park developed on the property of the Duke of Chartres, a cousin of Louis XVI.

It is located in one of the most sought after areas of Paris, which in the 9th century belonged to the Abbaye of Saint-Denis.

The monks enclosed their property within a perimeter wall and developed a small settlement on a hillock.

The village was known as Montchauf (from the Latin Mons Calvus - Bare hill) then Monceau.

It was one of the few settlements that dotted the land of moors, fields and forest, which remained a royal hunting ground until the 18th century.

Carmontelle's extravagant park

The Duke purchased the estate of Montchauf in 1778 and spared no expenses to build his magnificent Folie de Chartres.

He commissioned the architect Carmontelle with the landscaping of an extravagant English park.

Carmontelle produced a Roman temple, antique statues, a river with waterfall, water-lily pond, Chinese bridge, farmhouse, Dutch windmill, minaret, small Egyptian pyramid, fake gravestones and a grotto nestled among trees, thickets, bushes and flower beds!

The Colonnade de Carmontelle, the oval pond surrounded with Corinthian columns, is one of the original park’s few surviving features.

A decade later, the landscape gardener Thomas Blaikie transformed the park in an English garden, but the General Farmers Wall built in 1787 considerably reduced its size.

This unpopular fiscal wall demolished at the French Revolution.

All that is left of it is the Pavillon de Chartres built by the architect Ledoux.

Initially called Barrière de Chartres, it served as Customs Office and observation post.

The Folie de Chartres became state property at the Revolution, but was returned to Chartres' descendant, Louis Philippe I, during the 19th century.

Creation of the Parc Monceau

Half of the remaining park was developed with luxury properties in the 1850's.

The City of Paris purchased the other 9 hectares and the landscape architect Alphand created the current Parc Monceau.

Alphand replanted the park and created a circular path and two main alleys that traverse the park from east to west and north to south.

The architect Davioud added the superb dome roof to the Pavilion de Chartres - Rotonde du Parc Monceau.

The elegant rotunda is today a listed Historical Monument and main entrance to the Parc Monceau.

Davioud also replaced Carmontelle's Chinese bridge with the current one, which is modelled on the Rialto in Venice.

He also restored his superb Colonnade and oval pool, miniature Egyptian pyramid and fake gravestones.

Finally, he created the four monumental gilded wrought iron entrance gates.

A Renaissance arcade, recovered from the Hôtel-de-Ville destroyed during the Paris Commune of 1871, was later placed in the park.

The Parc Monceau is very popular with office workers, but also with young families because of its children recreation ground and permanent merry-go-round.

Opening hours: 7 am-10 pm in Summer - 7 am-8 pm in Winter.
Free Wi-Fi

Directions: 8th District
Metro: Monceau on Line 2
Coordinates: 48.879683 - Long 2.308955

Paris covered passages

Covered passages, gateways to the Paris of yesteryear

Discover Paris covered passages, pedestrian shopping arcades nestled under elegant glass roofs and charming witnesses of 19th century architecture
Passage Puteaux in Paris

Passage Puteaux, Paris shortest covered passage

Passage Puteaux, Paris' shortest covered passage and former shopping arcade, is today a short-cut between 2 streets in the Madeleine District
Passage des Deux Pavillons in Paris

Passage des Deux Pavillons, a short cut to Palais-Royal

Passage des Deux Pavillons, a tiny passage named after the pavilions that frame it, serves as short-cut between the Palais-Royal and Rue Vivienne
Passage des Princes - Cupola and entrance on Boulevard des Italiens

Passage des Princes, the haunt of video games and models

Passage des Princes, the last covered shopping arcade built in the 19th century, was fully renovated and is today the haunt of video games and models stores

Sign up to our newsletter

Travel France Online will use the information you provide on this form to keep in touch with you and to provide updates via our newsletter. By selecting the boxes on the form you confirm your acceptance to receive our newsletter.

You can change your mind at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of any email you receive from us, or by contacting us at admin@travelfranceonline.com

We will treat your information with respect. For more information please visit our privacy policy page