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Paris - Ile De France

Paris 8th District - 8eme Arrondissement

This page was updated on: Sunday, December 10, 2017 at: 6:40 pm

Paris 8th District

Paris 8th District is located on the Rive Droite and is commonly known as Quartier de l'Elysée.

It includes:

Quartier du Faubourg du Roule, Quartier de l’Europe, Quartier de la Madeleine and Quartier des Champs-Elysées.

Paris 8th District is the undisputed Mecca of luxury fashion and Haute Couture.

It is laid out around the affluent Faubourg St-Honoré, Champs-Elysées and Palais de l’Elysée.

Until the 18th century the modest villages of Ville-l’Evêque, Roule, Courcelles, Villiers and Monceau were the only communities to the west of the Louvre.

Rue du Faubourg St-Honoré was the main street of the village that developed outside the city walls and was then bordered with few mansions.

The village of Rolus appeared in the High Middle Ages and later expanded in two places.

Haut Roule grew near the Château des TernesBas-Roule developed near a leprosy.

Its church became the village's parish church in the late 17th century.

The development of Paris 8th District began in the 1770s with the opening of the Champs-Elysées, Avenue Gabriel and Rue Royale.

Place de la Concorde was then enlarged and transformed and the Madeleine Church built.

This urbanization encouraged the aristocracy, the upper-class and the politicians to built new mansions.

The Champs-Elysées soon became a vast entertainment zone.

Affluent Parisians happily mixed with the night crowds in the countless balls, restaurants, theatres, open air cafes and circuses.

The prestige of the district was consecrated in the first part of the 19th century with the construction of the Arc de Triomphe.

In the 1860s, Haussmann opened vast avenues, embellished the Champs-Elysées but all integrated peripheral villages into Paris.

This once more boosted the property market and pushed the limits of the city towards the west.

Two ambitious developers developed the Quartier de l'Europe from scratch in the 1830s.

Twenty-four streets bearing the names of European cities are laid out around the central square Place de l'Europe.

By the end of the 19th century, the affluent Paris 8th District had become the centre of the vivid intellectual, cultural and social life of the Belle-Epoque.

The establishment of countless theatres and private salons indeed played an important role!

They were the meeting point of the intelligentsia of the time where writers, artists, journalists and comedians gathered with politicians and bankers.

The Grand Palais and Petit Palais were built for the Universal Exhibition of 1900 and later converted into museums.

The boutiques of Haute Couture not only dressed elegant women, but also contributed to introduce new concepts that led to their emancipation.

Sadly, modern day Champs-Elysées has lost its atmosphere.

Most entertainment halls, famous cafes and restaurants were closed and have given place to banks and insurance headquarters and luxury shops.

The rest of the district, though, has retained its high concentration of theatres.

Metro stations serving Paris 8th District

Line 1: Charles de Gaulle-Etoile, George V, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Palais-Royal - Musée du Louvre, Champs-Elysées-Clémenceau, Concorde
Line 2: Charles de Gaulle-Etoile, Ternes, Courcelles, Monceau, Villiers, Clichy
Line 3: Villiers, Europe, Saint-Lazare
Line 9: Alma-Marceau, Franklin D. Roosevelt, St-Philippe du Roule, Miromesnil, Saint-Augsutin, Havre-Caumartin
Line 13: Clichy, Liège, Saint-Lazare, Miromesnil, Champs-Elysées-Clémenceau

Oversized reproductions of coins in Pont-Neuf Metro station

Pont-Neuf Metro station, a decor dedicated to the Paris Mint

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Hotel-de-Ville Metro station’s decoration

Hotel-de-Ville Metro station’s decor is dedicated to the town-hall of the City of Paris, which has been the seat of the city’s institutions since 1357
Rambuteau Metro station in Paris

Rambuteau Metro station, a colourful station

Rambuteau Metro station has a colourful indirect lighting to mimic the nextdoor Pompidou Center, which is known for its brightly coloured structure
Tuileries Metro station - Years 1930

Tuileries Metro station celebrates the Metro’s centenary

Tuileries Metro station boasts a stunning series of photo collages illustrating the past 11 decades to celebrate the Centenary of the Metropolitain de Paris

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