Paris – Ile De France

Paris 3rd District – 3eme Arrondissement

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Paris 3rd District

Paris 3rd District is located on the Rive Droite and is commonly known as Quartier du Temple.

Paris 3rd District includes:

Quartier des Arts et Métiers, Quartier des Enfants Rouges, Quartier Sainte Avoye and Quartier des Archives.

It is one of the most attractive districts, as it unfolds in the historic Marais.

The Marais is a protected area that boasts 163 mansions or Hôtels Particuliers dating from the 17th century.

Annoyingly, only 50 of these are listed Historical Monuments.

The Rive Droite remained deserted until the construction of the small oratory of St-Martin-des-Champs in the 11th century.

The fortified monastery the Knights Templar built in the 12th century left the area its unique identity.

The Enclos des Templiers was indeed an enclosed city within Paris.

It also attracted generations of craftsmen who work and thrived exempted of royal taxes.

Many streets and sites still bear the name of this long gone temple, hence the district’s ‘common name’!

Paris 3rd District renewed its identity during the urban development of the 17th century.

Thirty-six prestigious mansions were erected around Place des Vosges (4th district).

The French aristocracy and intellectual elite soon built their mansions in the vicinity of the square – the current 3rd district!

The Quartier des Arts et Métiers developed around the monastery of St-Martin-des-Champs.

The Abbey became national property at the French Revolution.

It was immediately converted in order to accommodate the Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers (college for the advanced education of working in commerce, manufacturing, design and construction).

The Quartier des Archives unfolds around the Hôtel de Soubise and Hôtel de Rohan.

These two prestigious mansions were also converted after the French Revolution in order to accommodate the National Archives.

The Hôpital des Enfants Rouges was founded in 1534.

This orphanage was named after the children’s red uniforms.

The institution, whose entrance was located at no83 Rue des Archives, closed in 1772.

The Quartier Sainte Avoye developed around the Passage d’Avoye, a lane that ran through the grounds of a mansion that was pulled down in the 19th century.

Sainte-Avoye was a 3rd century AD Christian martyr.

Fortunately spared by the excessive urbanization of the mid 19th century, the Marais (3rd and 4th districts) has retained its authenticity and its unique elegance.

It was listed in the 1960s and has undergone constant restoration since.

Paris 3rd District boasts about 20 passages and galleries built during the 19th century and essentially pedestrian.

Metro stations serving Paris 3rd District

Line 3: Réaumur Sébastopol, Arts et Métiers, République
Line 4: Strasbourg St-Denis, Réaumur Sébastopol
Line 8: Strasbourg St-Denis, République, Filles du Calvaire, St Sébastien Froissard, Chemin Vert
Line 11: Rambuteau, Arts et Métiers, République

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