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Paris - Ile De France

Paris 10th District - 10eme Arrondissement

This page was updated on: Sunday, December 10, 2017 at: 6:39 pm

Paris 10th District

Paris 10th District is located on the Rive Droite and is commonly known as Quartier de l'Enclos St-Laurent.

It includes:

Quartier Saint-Vincent de Paul, Quartier de L’Hôpital Saint-Louis, Quartier de la Porte Saint-Martin and Quartier de la Porte Saint-Denis.

One of the most populated areas of the capital, Paris 10th District is essentially dedicated to commerce and trade.

It has, however, retained a lovely provincial charm due to the redevelopment of the Canal Saint-Martin.

Some 2000 years the Romans opened a series of north-south roads through the marshy Rive Droite.

These roads have become Rue du Faubourg-St-Denis, Rue du Faubourg-St-Martin and Rue du Faubourg-Poissonnière.

A couples of monasteries were built in the area between the 11th and 13th centuries.

St-Lazare monastery ran Saint-Ladre leprosy, also known as Enclos Saint-Lazare.

The fairs founded by St-Laurent and St-Lazare monasteries became major commercial events and attracted the crowds.

Saint-Vincent-de-Paul bought the disused buildings of the Enclos St-Lazare during the 17th century and founded the Congregation de la Mission.

The terrible plagues of 1562, 1605 and 1606 contaminated so many people that the original St-Louis Hospital was enlarged fourfold.

It was also dedicated to Louis IX who died from the disease on his return from the 8th Crusade.

St-Louis is the oldest hospital of Paris and today specializes in dermatology.

The opening of the Grands Boulevards during the 17th century were a major east-west communication axis; they triggered the development of the areas in their vicinity.

By then, Louis XIV had established his authority over Europe; France was not threatened any more.

He therefore pulled down the perimeter wall of Louis XIII and replaced it with large avenues.

These were free of buildings and planted with trees and became a favourite place of promenade for the Parisians.

These 'Nouveaux Cours' became our current Grands Boulevards (Boulevards des Capucines, des Italiens, Montmartre, Bonne Nouvelle, St-Denis, St-Martin, du Temple and Beaumarchais).

Two triumphal arches, Porte St-Denis and Porte St-Martin were erected 100m north of the fortified gates.

They celebrated Louis XIV’s victories.

The construction of the fiscal Mur des Fermiers Généraux attracted a working class population and stimulated commerce and craft industry near the toll gates.

However, the real transformation of Paris 10th District occurred during the 19th century with the construction of the Canal St-Martin, Gare de l’Est and Gare du Nord.

The Grands Boulevards became, until WWII, also the focus of an intense cultural and artistic life.

Paris 10th District today has a high concentration of immigrants of North African and Asian origins.

The ongoing redevelopment of the Canal St-Martin revitalizes the district and turns it slowly into one of the most sought after area of the capital.

Metro stations serving Paris 10th District

Line 2: Barbès-Rochechouart, La Chapelle, Stalingrad, Jaurès, Colonel Fabien, Belleville
Line 4: Barbès-Rochechouart, Gare du Nord, Gare de l'Est, Château d'Eau, Strasbourg Saint-Denis
Line 5: Stalingrad, Gare du Nord, Gare de l'Est, Jacques Bonsergent, République
Line 7: Stalingrad, Louis Blanc, Château Landon, Gare de l'Est
Line 7bis: Louis Blanc, Jaurès
Line 9: Bonne Nouvelle, Strasbourg-Saint-Denis, République
Line 11: République, Goncourt, Belleville

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